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Monday, 23 October, 2017 - 15:45

Czech Pirate Party (Česká pirátská strana) made massive gains recently in their National Government, winning 22 seats making them the third largest party, polling only 0.5% behind Civic Democratic Party, the 2nd largest party but making significantly larger gains.

This 10.8% vote share is an 8.1% increase on their 2013 figures, where they polled 2.7% but didn't qualifty for any representatives.

David A Elston, Pirate Party UK Acting Leader said, "We send our congratulations to the Czech Pirate Party for their dramatic achievement. They have demonstrated that the...

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Government confirms disconnection plans

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The Queen's Speech didn't mention it, but government are pressing ahead with its plans to disconnect filesharers:

The most headline-grabbing part of the Digital Economy Bill will be a clampdown on onlinepiracy. Last month, Peter Mandelson set out the government's plans for a scheme which would see persistent online sharers of copyrighted material sent a series of warning letters before having their broadband connections slowed down or even suspended.

Music companies welcomed Mandelson's move, which goes further than the measures suggested by Carter in June's Digital Britain report, but internet service providers have warned that the cost of implementing the measures will outweigh the benefits.

There are also fears that innocent internet users could have their wireless broadband networks hijacked by pirates and fall victim to the tough new regime. One of the UK's largest internet service providers, TalkTalk, has already warned that it will launch legal action if the plan is put into action.

Michael Geist explains ACTA

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Professor Michael Geist of Ottawa University has produced a 20 minute talk introducing the Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) -- the secret copyright treaty currently being negotiated, which threatens to destory our rights on the internet at the behest of greedy corporations.  

McKinnon's Mum to Speak at Select Committee

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With few options left, Janis Sharp, Gary McKinnon's mother, remains indefatigable in her fight against Gary's extradition to the US. Gary, Janis and even the UK government acknowledges that Gary's crime was committed here in the UK, yet inexplicably the UK government calls itself 'powerless' to prevent Gary being carted to the US to face a disproportionate penalty. Pathetic words of sympathy are offered by Sarah Brown, the PM's wife, but what good will they do? What the government refuses to admit is that it is far from powerless. It just chooses not to act. Britain is a sovereign state. If the government permitted time, our parliament could change the law.

Pirates double their strength in Brussels

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Today the Czech President, Vaclav Klaus, signed the Lisbon Treaty, which will come into force on the 1st of December. Under Lisbon, the number of MEPs for each member state is changed: Sweden now gets 20 instead of 18. One of these two new MEPs is Amelia Andersdotter of the Swedish Pirate Party, and she joins her colleague Christian Engström, bringing the Pirate Party's strength in the European Parliament to two.

Filesharers buy more music

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The music industry wants to disconnect filesharers from the internet, because it says that they are reducing its revenue by copying music without buying it. But how much revenue is the music industry losing? According to a survey, filesharers actually buy more recorded music than non-filesharers:

Adults who download music from unofficial channels also spend £30 per year more on physical and digital music than people who don’t, according to a survey by the Demos thinktank of 1,008 people aged 16 to 50.

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