Written by: Mark Chapman

Written by: David Elston

Written by: David Elston

Written by: David Elston

Written by: David Elston

Written by: Danfox Davies

Written by: Danfox Davies

Written by: Danfox Davies

Written by: Mark Chapman

Written by: Loz Kaye

Written by: Andy Halsall

Written by: Adrian Short

Written by: Loz Kaye

Written by: Loz Kaye

Written by: Andy Halsall

Written by: Andy Halsall

Garry Kitchin : Why Pirate Party UK members should stand in the 2018 Local Elections

This year there will be local elections electing over 4,000 Councillors. This article will argue that the Pirate Pirate UK should fully contest them.

Why should I stand as a Pirate Candidate in my local area?

Elections can very hard for small political parties. They can cost a lot of money, and stretch a small membership to breaking point. History would point to very little success for all this effort. So why do it?

Smaller political parties suffer greatly from a lack of recognition among the general public. This is true of the Pirate Party UK too. Those who follow politics closely have probably heard of the party, but would struggle to know its key messages. Amongst the much larger group of voters, who only switch on politically for a few weeks before an election, I suspect the name of the Pirate Party doesn't even register. The only way to improve this is to get out ourselves and spread the message. No-one else will do this, so if we won't do it, no-one will.

This short period of voter's attention is key. Every candidate that stands for the Pirate Party is another name and logo on every single ballot paper in that area. When people see Pirate candidates alongside Labour, Conservative and the Lib Dems, it sends a message that we have arrived and that a genuine alternative, not just another colour to pick from, is ready.

During a local election campaign it is very common for local papers to approach candidates for perhaps a 100-200 words statement that is printed or published online before the election day. Some areas arrange a hustings, where candidates can attend and speak to people in the community. Each of these should be organised so that every candidate gets equal time and status.

Adrian Farrel : Why Responding to Terrorism with Curtailed Digital Freedom is Wrong

It is hard for anyone to continue the political debate in the aftermath of the events of Monday 22nd may in Manchester. Our thoughts are all occupied with concern for all those affected, and with love for our own children.

But one of the objectives behind this sort of attack is to disrupt our political system, to damage democracy, and cause us to change our way of life. The intention is to instil fear into us all, to cause us to hide and become hostile, to make us different from the open and culturally diverse nation that we are. It is important, as a way to mitigate this attack, that we strengthen the political debate and act to preserve our freedoms, rights, and civil liberties. We cannot bring back those who were killed, and we can only hope that the wounds, both physical and psychological, heal with time, but we can show the terrorists that we will not allow them to take our society down.

Several questions that are close to the centre of Pirate Party politics need to be addressed immediately. They are fundamental to the debate about freedom and yet appear to offer direct methods to reduce the likelihood of future attacks.

1. Information on how to make bombs is available online

It is true that all manner of very horrible things can be found on line. Some can be put to bad uses by people who want to do us harm. Some things are of their nature unacceptable.

In general, where illegal material is hosted on servers in the UK, the police already have powers to have that content removed. No new laws or powers are needed.

Mark Chapman : "Crackdown on illegal downloading"

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