Written by: Mark Chapman

Written by: David Elston

Written by: David Elston

Written by: David Elston

Written by: David Elston

Written by: Danfox Davies

Written by: Danfox Davies

Written by: Danfox Davies

Written by: Mark Chapman

Written by: Loz Kaye

Written by: Andy Halsall

Written by: Adrian Short

Written by: Loz Kaye

Written by: Loz Kaye

Written by: Andy Halsall

Written by: Andy Halsall

Wendy Cockcroft : Opinion: 'Middle-Out' A Pirate Solution For The Economy?

 

I'm basically a moderate conservative who sees the need for a well-funded welfare state governed by and for the people via a decentralised, distributed democratic process. My personal motto is,

"The individual must be free to act and the will of the people must be respected."

If this principle is not at the core of every policy those policies will fail. The needs and desires of BOTH the many and the one must be kept in balance, with neither gaining the advantage over the other if we want a fairer world. It's the reason I don't vote for the major parties; each of their philosophies tends towards nanny-knows-best authoritarianism and I don't like being told what to do by people who don't care about me.

At the moment, we're caught between the Left/Right dichotomy with either Socialism or Free Market Supply-side ideologies being touted as the solution despite neither of them ever having been proven to work in practice. Middle-out is a departure from both and would create a more inclusive society by providing incentives for production, rewarding labour, and funding a robust welfare state. Let's take a closer look at it.

Loz Kaye : Iraq - Repeating Past Mistakes

Before we move forward against ISIL in Iraq, we have to learn from our past mistakes, or we will be doomed to repeat them.

So here we are again. Parliament has voted to back military intervention in Iraq. In fact it is not so much as here we go again, as back to business as usual. Since 1990 we have been militarily involved in the country every year apart from 2012 and 2013. That in itself should give us pause for thought. 

It's certainly the case that the most recent Iraq war has left a deep scar on British politics. Cameron is clearly all too aware of that with his statement that we should not let the mistakes of the past affect decisions about the future. 

But the mistakes of the past are much broader than the "dodgy dossier". What the rise of ISIL shows is that the implementation of our entire defence strategy has been mistaken. The stated aims have been to tackle instability, identify security risks, to exploit influence to manage risks, to help resolve conflicts and strengthen international norms.

Does giving ISIL what it wants with a scrap in their own back yard achieve any of this? Plainly, no. US and UK strikes pave the way to further undermining the territorial integrity of Iraq, the precise opposite of the motion agreed.

Andy Halsall : The cost of action in Iraq

Our involvement must be more than military and truly in the cause of freedom and democracy.

When parliament voted to invade Iraq in 2003, it was based on what we later found out to be disinformation and deceit. We were misled. The countless thousands who opposed the war were vocal in their opposition - but they were not listened to, they were ignored. And the UK went to war.

Today, Iraq isn't the beacon of peace and democracy that we had hoped it would become, in a region with far too little of either. Far from it. Iraq is a very troubled state. The sectarian divisions that arose after our invasion and the impact of the poor planning and even poorer decisions taken during the post-invasion period continue to hinder progress and freedom in Iraq.

It is absolutely true that the situation in Iraq is at least in part down to the choices we made in 2003. Yet the decision parliament was asked to make today was very different, the situation it aims to address is different and the context in which it was raised is different.  

Chris Monteiro : Who made this? Could digitally registered images be the future for creators?

It's a difficult time to be a photographer. With the ubiquity of high resolution camera phones and online sharing technologies, the work of a creator claiming appropriate credit for their work, let alone compensation has never been more difficult. Whilst the cost of media duplication has dropped to almost nothing, many fear the means to appropriately credit and compensate creators, especially individuals and small businesses have been destroyed by these modern technologies.

In April 2013 the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act was passed which allow use of 'orphaned works', which is to say if you can't find the owner of an image after a 'diligent search', then you may now use the work where as previously you typically could not legally do so. This marked a fundamental shift in the UK government's approach to content sharing from presumption of copyright, to proof of copyright being required. Whilst this move has opened a market more amenable to sharing in the internet age, serious concerns from photographer's groups have been raised  that this legalisation fundamentally undermines the rights to their works.

Pages

More Information

Chat with us

   

Upcoming Dates

Social Media

Twitter icon Facebook icon RSS icon YouTube icon

Current Internal Elections

Board of Governors Election - June 2017 - View
Nominations opened: 15 June, 2017 - 19:30
Nominations close: Thursday, 29 June, 2017 - 19:30