Care Data

Confidential Healthcare Data to be shared with Pharmacists

Monday, 10 August, 2015 - 23:15

In what is effectively a forerunner to the controversial Care.data project from NHS England Pharmacies (including of course Boots, Tesco and Superdrug) will now have access to patient’s confidential data (the so called 'Summary Care Record'). This is being rolled out across England following a pilot scheme in 140 pharmacies where almost 2000 patient’s records were accessed.

NHS: Big Brother Knows Best, Your Decisions Mean Nothing.

Danfox Davies's picture

In yet another act sure to increase the speed of George Orwell's rotations in his grave, the NHS has decided that the opt-out forms I pointed out to many of you a year ago are not worth the paper they are printed on or emails they are sent in. Because, you see, you might have not understood fully the implications of opting out of your data being shared with private companies.  

Care Data

There is nothing more important than your health and knowing you can talk to a doctor or nurse in confidence. Now this government has put that at risk.  Your doctor will soon have to constantly supply your personal medical data to a central information centre, the "Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)". And these data can be given to organisations outside the NHS. 

Opinion: NHS "care.data": You Are Not a Patient, You Are a Commodity

Editor's picture

Danfox Davies – PPUK Contributor, Student, Hackerspace Leader

Well, what do you know. The government saw fit to send us a message about the NHS and all the wonderful things they are doing for us with it. The Guardian tells us a bit about it here.

I suppose we should be happy. A comprehensive database will help medical researchers stop epidemics before they start. It will help identify side-effects of drugs that didn't show up in testing... Brilliant, that's joined-up thinking, we should praise the technological awakening of our state healthcare system – the time it saves could even be enough to start reversing the fortunes of some of the hospitals the health secretary seems so eager to close. Big Data, it seems at a glance, may just have saved our NHS. Not that we should be proud of it. No, in fact the government seems to have done its level best to ensure we don't even notice the change has happened, whilst still just about claiming they are fulfilling their legal obligations to inform of these changes to our health service.