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Fake Globalisation: Propaganda Lives On

Danfox Davies's picture

False Globalisation

Propaganda Lives On

 

by Danfox Davies | Bucureşti, Romania 16th September 2015 – Edited in Blarney, Ireland 17th August 2017

 

The presence of the spectre of the TPP, TTIP and TISA secretive ‘trade’ deals (and many other such deals like them) would lead anyone to think that the world is becoming increasingly homogenised for corporate purposes, that a grand unification of the hundreds of countries into one subservient consumer mass is already underway and importantly that no-one either can or should do anything to stop this. Coca-Cola and Pepsi bottles and cans can be found the world over, every city has a McDonald’s or ten and why would any country wish to impede this availability of consumer familiarity that everyone knows and loves (to hate)? Why indeed?

Sir Ivan Rogers, UK's ambassador to the EU quits

Jason Halsey's picture

Sir Ivan, the man who would play a main role in the negotiations with the EU during the UKs extraction has resigned, sending a 1400-word thank you letter to his staff setting out his problems with why he felt his position was untenable and the current Governments position with regards to leaving the EU.

He begins his letter reminding the team that he was due to leave later this year

“As most of you will know, I started here in November 2013. My four-year tour is therefore due to end in October - although in practice if we had been doing the Presidency my time here would have been extended by a few months.

As we look ahead to the likely timetable for the next few years, and with the invocation of Article 50 coming up shortly, it is obvious that it will be best if the top team in situ at the time that Article 50 is invoked remains there till the end of the process and can also see through the negotiations for any new deal between the UK and the EU27.

It would obviously make no sense for my role to change hands later this year.

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EU Court of Justice Invalidates "Safe Harbor" Agreement

Tuesday, 6 October, 2015 - 13:15

In a landmark ruling today the Court of Justice of the European Union found that the current 'Safe Harbor' agreement (which underpins the vast majority of the transfer of data from the EU to the US) is invalid. This ruling strikes an important blow for data protection for EU citizens.
Safe Harbor has long been used by large corporations to justify transferring data out of UK and EU datacentres, into US based locations. By using "Safe Harbor", companies agree to be bound by the same restrictions as they have in the US, despite not being explicitly required to do so by US law.

Opinion: EU VAT Mess

As noted by Mark Chapman on 15th December 2014, the VATMOSS VATMESS had the potential to cause untold problems for small digital sellers. The following is the personal experience of Sharon, Pirate Party member and small business owner, which bears out the concerns and issues.


This is a personal account of my experience and knowledge of the new rules.

Having run my own web design business for six years, and in the process of expanding into online courses to generate income, imagine my total surprise and shock when I started seeing news circulating in November last year about new rules coming into force on 1st January 2015 regarding B2C digital sales to the EU.

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Andy Halsall : Let's make being 'Wrong on Rights' unelectable

When it comes to the clash between surveillance and civil liberties, it seems the fight is still very much on. It's a war we have to win and with the General Election looming, making the case that mass surveillance and privacy should be important issues for voters is pretty vital.

Happily, on that score, there have been a number of developments that might just help us move the debate forward.

On Monday, the Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights, Europe’s top rights body published a report that shows that it believes mass surveillance is a significant threat to human rights.  That's good news for anyone hoping to see a rolling back of the surveillance state.

The report recognises what the Pirate Party and others have been saying for years about the threat of mass surveillance. Like us, it did not shy away from discussing the disclosures made by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden:

“The disclosures have provided compelling evidence of the existence of far-reaching, technologically advanced systems put in place by US intelligence services and their partners in certain Council of Europe member states to collect, store and analyse communication data, including content, location and other metadata, on a massive scale”

Opening the door to radical reform

Loz Kaye's picture

One of the defining issues that kicked off the Pirate movement was copyright. It was possibly the most defining issue, though post Snowden things look very different now. The web depends on sharing, transmitting, copying. And it was radical that this should be a political issue, not just an obsession for law geeks.

So obviously, it was seen of something of a triumph that Julia Reda  MEP was given the task of being Copyright Rapporteur. I'm sure we were all aware of the political danger. Anything too radical would have been ripped apart, not advocating for our views would be a significant failure. It's also true that being in the Green group is where we can get most influence now, they will also hold us back.  

Information Commissioner decides Home Office must release report on EU Freedom of Movement

Friday, 4 July, 2014 - 14:30

A controversial report into EU Freedom of Movement, written as part of the government's review of the balance of competencies within the European Union must be disclosed, the Information Commissioner has decided.
The report was due to be published at the end of 2013, but unlike the other eight reports published on the 13th of February 2014, the 'Single Market: Free Movement of Persons' report was held back, with reports from some sources claiming that it had been held back indefinitely.

Maria Aretoulaki : European Court of Justice Google ruling gives the Dog a Bone

Yesterday the European Court of Justice, based in Luxembourg, passed a landmark ruling that has caused a lot of jubilation among data privacy advocates: the Google US and Spain versus the Spanish Agency for Data Protection and a brave Spaniard who sued Google for listing information on his repossessed home in its search results.

It has been hailed as the precedent that will secure individuals the "right to be forgotten" from the internet, if they so wish. Drunken pics of you and your mates on Facebook? Looking for a job? Ask for those photos to be taken down before the HR guy discovers them 30mins before your interview! Sorted! Or is it?

Sifting through the legalese, let's concentrate just on the actual ruling, i.e. Points 1-4 at the very end of the document / webpage. If you don't get distracted by the article numbers and opening and closing paragraphs, the ECJ has actually ruled the following:

1.       Article 2(b) and (d) of Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 1995 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data are to be interpreted as meaning that, first, the activity of a search engine consisting in finding information published or placed on the internet by third parties, indexing it automatically, storing it temporarily and, finally, making it available to internet users according to a particular order of preference must be classified as ‘processing of personal data’ within the meaning of Article 2(b) when that information contains personal data and, second, the operator of the search engine must be regarded as the ‘controller’ in respect of that processing, within the meaning of Article 2(d).

Maria Aretoulaki : "Bloody EU regulations, coming here and giving us rights!"

Unfortunately, the current political rhetoric on the subject of EU membership focuses on "immigration" and "foreigners coming here and stealing our jobs". Nobody is talking about all the "foreigners" who come here and pay taxes which fund UK schools and UK hospitals, nor of the "foreigners" who set up businesses here and give Brits jobs (as well as contribute to the growth of the UK Economy). And of course nobody is talking about all the Brits who emigrate and thrive in other EU countries. Even less do we speak of all the "Bloody EU Regulations, coming to this country and giving us rights!" to adapt the Tweet shown here. We all need to rethink our relationship with the EU, as well as demand its democratic reform. What we need is Family therapy. It would be wrong to go straight for Divorce. The first step is of course to go out and vote in the European Parliamentary Elections! And vote for candidates who stand for democracy and civil and human rights. The fewer people go out and vote, the less representative of our will, beliefs, and needs the appointed MEPs are going to be. This is what brings fascists into power: apathy and scapegoats.

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