EU

ACTA on the ropes in the EU, but the G8 are working on a follow-up.

Monday, 16 April, 2012 - 18:15

The Pirate Party UK were invited to a seminar organised by David Martin, the European Parliament's rapporteur on ACTA, at the weekend, along with representatives from the Open Rights Group and the Anti-Counterfeiting Group. At the end of a healthy discussion, David Martin indicated that he was going to recommend against the European Parliament adopting the treaty, and has since declared the treaty to be "dead" in Europe.

Acting on ACTA - What We Can Do

Will Tovey's picture

Earlier today, Loz Kaye, leader of the Pirate Party, published a statement highlighting a major threat to the Internet, to civil liberties, and our political and legal systems; ACTA. Following this, the Party has received many requests asking what we, ordinary citizens, can do about this and the best way to stop it.

ACTA - the latest threat to internet freedom, just signed by the EU

Friday, 27 January, 2012 - 13:45

Yesterday the European Union, the UK and over 20 other countries signed the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). ACTA is an international treaty, disguised as a trade agreement, whose purpose is to increase and harmonise copyright and trademark enforcement. Many of the goals of ACTA are similar to SOPA and PIPA - proposed laws which the US congress recently abandoned following a huge outcry. ACTA is, if anything, even more objectionable.

Stop Copyright Extension Now

Will Tovey's picture


Once again a move to extend copyright is making its way through the European Parliament. The move to extend the copyright on sound recordings (and other "neighbouring rights") began in April 2009 when, under intense pressure from the music publishing lobby, the European Parliament agreed to increase the duration of this copyright from 50 years to 70 years (compromising on the Commission's and lobbyists' demand of 95 years).

However, before this could be implemented, elections were called and a new Parliament was voted in, including one member from the Pirate movement. Now, nearly two years later, this process has been resurrected following a change of heart within the Danish government.

The Telecoms Package - a failure for democracy

Editor's picture

This week has seen some rather worrying developments in Europe. Thursday saw the final barrier to France's three strikes law removed as the Constitutional Court ruled that it was legal. This is the first such law to be passed specifically to target illegal file-sharers and is unlikely to be the last. This action was supported by the recent progress made in Brussels with the notorious Telecoms Reform Package, legislation that will decide what restrictions can be placed on disconnected Internet users.

Pages

More Information

Chat with us

   

Upcoming Dates

Social Media

Twitter icon Facebook icon RSS icon YouTube icon

Current Internal Elections

We are not currently running any internal elections but to see what positions are open for nominations, check here.