European Union

UK Government will not achieve anything unless it works together

Wednesday, 29 March, 2017 - 16:15

Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty was triggered today by Prime Minister Theresa May.

Britain's ambassador to the EU, Sir Tim Barrow, has already hand-delivered the six page letter from May to the EU Council President Donald Tusk in Brussels to formally begin proceedings.

Today, in Prime Minister's Questions, the Commons had their chance to speak with the Prime Minister on what the letter contained and to raise their concerns.

Pirate Party UK Acting Leader, David A Elston said:

PPUK After the Brexit Referendum

Adrian Farrel's picture

Ahoy fellow Pirates.

Regardless of which way you voted, I'm sure you're tired of hearing about the referendum and plundering politicians but PPUK is impacted by many of the issues raised by the process and fact of Brexit.

Transparency in Campaigning

Both the Leave and Remain campaigns were based on lies and fear. Little concrete evidence was supplied and both sides of the debate can carry some blame despite the fact that real information and data was available to researchers. It seems as though the politicians and campaigners were more interested in stirring up emotional responses than in having a measured and constructive debate.

What treatment would we in PPUK like to see for those who lie on a public platform during a referendum campaign? How would we like to see the media held to account? How would we expect information to be presented to the public in future campaigns?

Ridiculing of "Experts"

During the campaign, Michael Gove said: "People in this country have had enough of experts" and this seemed to strike a chord across the voting public.

A Pirate reads Piketty, part 4: Transparency

George Walkden's picture

Transparency and its sister, the flip side of the coin, privacy, are at the heart of Pirate politics. The first of the seven principles on which the PPUK constitution is founded states that society is built on the sharing of knowledge (and we've already seen how important that is in reducing inequality, according to Piketty). The third principle makes this more explicit with respect to the role of government: "Everyone should have a say in the structure and processes of governance and the right to know what is done on their behalf".

Opening the door to radical reform

Loz Kaye's picture

One of the defining issues that kicked off the Pirate movement was copyright. It was possibly the most defining issue, though post Snowden things look very different now. The web depends on sharing, transmitting, copying. And it was radical that this should be a political issue, not just an obsession for law geeks.

So obviously, it was seen of something of a triumph that Julia Reda  MEP was given the task of being Copyright Rapporteur. I'm sure we were all aware of the political danger. Anything too radical would have been ripped apart, not advocating for our views would be a significant failure. It's also true that being in the Green group is where we can get most influence now, they will also hold us back.  

Human Rights No, Corporate Rights Yes?

Andrew Norton's picture

It’s become a hallmark of British Government that they say one thing and do another. Rarely is it ever so cut-and-dried as with the current Conservative government.

Much has been made over the last few weeks about the desires of the Prime Minister to leave the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). Cameron has said he wants to bring more powers back to London, because he doesn’t like the way it ‘hands power’ off – powers we British have given to that court more than 60 years ago. Most notably, he doesn’t like the way it often deals with his right wing agenda of disenfranchising people, and creeping towards a police state, but seems to be championing the way with misinformation.

 

It’s quite surprising to note then, that he has not been an outspoken critic of the Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership (TTIP) or the Comprehensive  Economic and Trade  Agreement (CETA) which was released yesterday. In fact, he has been portrayed as a massive supporter of the TTIP, and CETA.

“Why is that surprising?”, you might ask, and the answer is simple. The entire thrust of his anti-ECHR campaign, has been that the court takes power ‘out of London’. He has no problem with ‘Human Rights’, but wants to somehow bring it entirely inside the UK, no matter the outside cost (there may well be significant consequences to leaving the ECHR). In essence, he wants a UK subservient only to UK judges. 

You want to vote Pirate? It'd be rude not to oblige.

Editor's picture

We can do better, and we will - We want to stand more candidates with more local branches.

Voting Pirate

Ever since the Pirate Party came on the scene in 2009, some people have been able to vote Pirate in local, parliamentary and most recently european elections. But never as many as we would like.

There have been 22 Pirate Party candidates since 2009. Your candidates have stood in 24 different elections, ranging from local elections in England and Scotland, Parliamentary elections, European Elections and a whole host of by-elections.  

In the five years we have been standing in elections we have learned a lot, and changed the way we approach elections almost entirely.  We have have gone from receiving tens of votes in our first elections, to thousands in our most recent. In the EU election,  8,600 people felt confident enough to put crosses next to our name.

Our proportion of the vote has changed too, where we have active branches, even in areas massively dominated by the biggest parties, we are now seeing anything up to 5% of voters putting an X next to our candidates names.

We have come a long way in a short time, but we have along way to go.

Scored on policy by 38 Degrees

We've been fighting the European Parliamentary Elections on policy, so it was great to be contacted by 38 Degrees about our positions on a range of issues, we responded, but I thought you might like to read a little bit more about how 38 Degrees arrived at their score card and of course what we said!

The process

In the run up 150,000 38 Degrees members were asked to vote on the issues that were their top priorities for the EU Election. The issues were put together by 38 degrees and included campaign topics and suggestions from their membership. The result of the vote there were six issues that 38 Degrees members wanted to prioritise, these were:

  • protecting our public services and environment from TTIP (The Trans-atlantic trade and Investment Partnership).
  • protecting our Bees from poisonous pesticides
  • cracking down on tax-dodging
  • protecting our private data through stronger rules on data protection
  • getting stronger employment rights for workers
  • getting stronger targets for reducing carbon emissions to protect our climate

UK Government not so neutral on Net Neutrality

Monday, 19 May, 2014 - 13:30

In April, the European Parliament adopted draft legislation as part of a move to regulate the European Telecommunications market. This included the formal adoption of Net Neutrality. Net Neutrality is a principle which states that internet service providers must treat all traffic equally regardless of source, and cannot charge for the preferential treatment of their subscribers or a particular service.

Maria Aretoulaki : European Court of Justice Google ruling gives the Dog a Bone

Yesterday the European Court of Justice, based in Luxembourg, passed a landmark ruling that has caused a lot of jubilation among data privacy advocates: the Google US and Spain versus the Spanish Agency for Data Protection and a brave Spaniard who sued Google for listing information on his repossessed home in its search results.

It has been hailed as the precedent that will secure individuals the "right to be forgotten" from the internet, if they so wish. Drunken pics of you and your mates on Facebook? Looking for a job? Ask for those photos to be taken down before the HR guy discovers them 30mins before your interview! Sorted! Or is it?

Sifting through the legalese, let's concentrate just on the actual ruling, i.e. Points 1-4 at the very end of the document / webpage. If you don't get distracted by the article numbers and opening and closing paragraphs, the ECJ has actually ruled the following:

1.       Article 2(b) and (d) of Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 1995 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data are to be interpreted as meaning that, first, the activity of a search engine consisting in finding information published or placed on the internet by third parties, indexing it automatically, storing it temporarily and, finally, making it available to internet users according to a particular order of preference must be classified as ‘processing of personal data’ within the meaning of Article 2(b) when that information contains personal data and, second, the operator of the search engine must be regarded as the ‘controller’ in respect of that processing, within the meaning of Article 2(d).

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