File sharing

Pirate Party UK outraged by Scottish filesharing conviction

Tuesday, 10 May, 2011 - 18:15

he Pirate Party UK was appalled to hear today of the conviction of 58 year-old auxiliary nurse Anne Muir in the Ayr Sheriff Court under section 107(1)(e) of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act for alleged peer-to-peer file-sharing. This is the first criminal conviction for P2P file-sharing in Scotland.

Panorama programme on disconnecting filesharers

Editor's picture

 Tomorrow (Monday) Panorama will be covering the government's plans to disconnect the internet connections of alleged filesharers. Here's the blurb:

A proposed new law is threatening to disconnect the millions of internet users who unlawfully download free music, films and TV. Jo Whiley looks at how broadband use at home may never be the same, and could even be cut off.

Urgent: Tell Parliament what you think about your rights

Editor's picture

The Joint parliamentary committee on  human rights are currently looking for submissions on human rights issues relating particularly to proposed legislation.  I came across it quite by chance - but it is a superb opportunity for interested citizens to get their views across - but you need to act now!

I won’t vote for any MP who supports Mandelson’s Digital Economy Bill

Editor's picture

I’ve just started a new facebook group: I won’t vote for any MP who supports Mandelson’s Digital Economy Bill.

 

The Digital Economy Bill plans to disconnect people from the internet if they’ve merely been accused of filesharing, or if anyone sharing their connection has been so accused. This is a breach of our human rights, and must be opposed.


What the Queen didn't say

Editor's picture

The Queen's speech was notable not so much for the new announcements in it, but for the things it didn't include. Her Majesty did not say that her government would disconnect it's citizen's internet connections, or introduce a £50,000 fine for infringing the copyright of a file that cost £0.00 to reproduce, or that it would give harsher penalties for downloading a file for free than for buying the exact same information on a counterfeit disc.

 

But don't be fooled. This isn't a sudden outbreak of common sense, all those ill-considered provisions are still there, but for some reason the government forgot to tell the public about them in the Queen's speech. 

 

Filesharers buy more music

Editor's picture

The music industry wants to disconnect filesharers from the internet, because it says that they are reducing its revenue by copying music without buying it. But how much revenue is the music industry losing? According to a survey, filesharers actually buy more recorded music than non-filesharers:

Adults who download music from unofficial channels also spend £30 per year more on physical and digital music than people who don’t, according to a survey by the Demos thinktank of 1,008 people aged 16 to 50.

Sign the petition, and Talk Talk like a Pirate!

Editor's picture

Recently we've seen a wide array of campaigns and discussion forums about pirate politics. Billy Bragg has started a discussion blog, the Open Rights Group have done a lot of good work to raise awareness and talk sense about disconnection, and of course they have been a lot of petitions set up on the Number 10 website aimed at pointing out how wrong the government are to wage war on their own citizens over file sharing.

Now, a new player has entered the field of pirate politics, with a campaign against disconnection. Andrew Heany's petition against disconnections is different in one major way from all the others because it has the backing of the company he works for. Since he's Executive Director of strategy and Regulation at Talk Talk, this means we now have one of Britain's biggest ISPs actively supporting pirate policies.

MPs start to 'get it'

Editor's picture

Wouldn't it be good if MPs understood the futility of disconnecting alleged copyright infringers because it is so easy for file-sharers to mask their identity and activity?

Wouldn't it be good if MPs acknowledged that illicit file-sharing only costs rights-holders money when people download infringing content in preference to buying it, and that identifying offenders using the IP address of a specific machine may punish those who share a web connection?

Wouldn't it be good if MPs called on the Government to ensure that anyone accused of illicit file-sharing is given the right to legal redress in a court of law before sanctions are imposed?

Last day for consultation responses

Editor's picture

When the Pirate Party UK was formally registered, one of the first things we did was ask our members to respond to the government's consultation on P2P file sharing. Since then we've seen a lot of developments, with Lord Mandelson threatening to cut whole families off the net for the actions of just one person, and various lobby groups such as the Featured Artists Coalition coming up with their own, often contradictory statements.

If we don't want these profit-motivated groups to write their own laws, then we need to make our voices heard, and one way to do this iby responding to this consultation document.

Musicians oppose disconnecting filesharers

Editor's picture

The BBC is reporting that many musicians oppose the government's plans to disconnect filesharers:

An alliance of music stars, songwriters and record producers has spoken out against UK government proposals to kick file-sharers off the internet.

Persistent file-sharers could have their internet accounts suspended in an attempt to crack down on piracy. But Radiohead guitarist Ed O'Brien, a member of the Featured Artists' Coalition (FAC), said: "It's going to start a war which they'll never win."

Pages

More Information

Chat with us

   

Upcoming Dates

Social Media

Twitter icon Facebook icon RSS icon YouTube icon

Current Internal Elections

Board of Governors Election - June 2017 - View
Nominations opened: 15 June, 2017 - 19:30
Nominations close: Thursday, 29 June, 2017 - 19:30