Internet

Declaration of cyberspace

A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace

BY JOHN PERRY BARLOW

Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.

We have no elected government, nor are we likely to have one, so I address you with no greater authority than that with which liberty itself always speaks. I declare the global social space we are building to be naturally independent of the tyrannies you seek to impose on us. You have no moral right to rule us nor do you possess any methods of enforcement we have true reason to fear.

Real Action For Children Not Censorship

Loz Kaye's picture

So a week in to the General Election campaign, and finally the Internet has been noticed by one of the big old parties.

It wasn't a mention of the benefit the web brings to our economy, not to open up access to technology, not to put actual figures on the vague promises in George Osborne's budget on digital infrastructure.

No, it was screaming tabloid headlines and a promise from the Tories to bring in web blocking powers, Internet regulation and what amounts to electronic ID cards.

This was all under pretence of protecting children with measures we have repeatedly pointed out that do nothing of the sort.

Should public libraries block payday loan websites?

Several UK councils are now blocking access to payday loan websites in their libraries and on their public wifi networks. Some, such as Nottingham City Council, are also redirecting users trying to visit those sites to the website of the local credit union. Usually this web blocking is part of a wider anti-debt strategy designed to help local people manage their money better that might include debt advice and personal finance courses.

This is a fundamental shift in how public libraries think about providing internet access. Public libraries have always blocked some websites. They block illegal material such as child abuse images and political extremism. And they block legal pornography because viewing it could be disruptive and offensive to some patrons beyond the person who’s choosing to view it. But blocking the websites of legal businesses because the council disagrees with some of their commercial practices takes us into the realm of paternalism: restricting access to information for the individual’s supposed own good.

Loz Kaye on ACTA crash: Politically poisonous to be anti-Internet

Europe's Internet users welcomed the EU parliament's decision to reject a controversial anti-piracy treaty. ACTA which is an international trade agreement is aimed at preventing large-scale intellectual property theft. Critics claim the treaty would threaten people's web freedom. Outside the EU, ACTA has been signed by the US, Canada, Japan and several other countries. Loz Kaye, from the Pirate Party UK, says the rejection by the EU Parliament is a historic victory for citizens over lobbyists.

 

Thursday, 5 July, 2012 - 23:00

UK Government wants to throw filesharers in jail

OVERBEARING UK GOVERNMENT ministers have called for custodial sentences for persistent filesharing offenders.

The INQUIRER spoke with Loz Kaye, leader of the UK Pirate Party. He told us in a statement, "It is beyond belief that the coalition continues to swallow the copyright fundamentalist line uncritically. These draconian proposals of 10 years for 'digital copyright theft' are completely out of proportion. Compare to the 30 months that Stuart Hall got for indecent assaults on girls, for example.

Thursday, 23 January, 2014 - 23:00

The internet natives are revolting

Loz Kaye responds to President Sarkozy's proposal of a 'civilised internet'

It's not a blank territory, or a collection of tubes, it is a true community. Instead of narrow exploitation, the web emphasises cooperation and sharing for mutual cultural and economic benefit. Instead of isolationism and xenophobia, the web encourages free communication across borders. Instead of staid hierarchies, the web allows us all the opportunity to be active rather than passive participants in the world around us. But this can only remain the case if the internet is allowed to continue without undue interference and fettering.

 

Tuesday, 31 May, 2011 - 23:00

Net Policy

The digital revolution has changed social and economic structures throughout Europe; free and equal access to the internet is now a basic requirement for participation in civil society.

Citizens should have the option to access the Internet anonymously.

PIRATES wish to include the right of “digital participation” in the European Charter of Fundamental Rights.

Net Neutrality

The principle of network neutrality must become European law to ensure strong incentives for investment, fair competition and equal treatment of everybody in the digital space.

RT: Loz Kaye on ACTA crash- Politically poisonous to be anti-Internet

Europe's Internet users welcomed the EU parliament's decision to reject a controversial anti-piracy treaty. ACTA which is an international trade agreement is aimed at preventing large-scale intellectual property theft. Critics claim the treaty would threaten people's web freedom. Outside the EU, ACTA has been signed by the US, Canada, Japan and several other countries. Loz Kaye, from the Pirate Party UK, says the rejection by the EU Parliament is a historic victory for citizens over lobbyists.

Thursday, 5 July, 2012 - 01:00

US legislators are urged to drop SOPA

Closer to home, Loz Kaye, the leader of the UK Pirate Party, warned that SOPA would not only affect the internet as Americans know it, but the internet as a whole.

"SOPA is an attack on the very heart of how the Internet functions. Such sweeping draconian legislation threatens any kind of share-content site on the web. It should give sponsors of the bill pause for thought that even such major companies as Google, Yahoo and Facebook have been vocal in their opposition," he said in a statement to the INQUIRER.

Monday, 21 November, 2011 (All day)

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