#IPBill

Snoopers Charter declared illegal, Pirates call on Government to rethink surveillance regime

Tuesday, 30 January, 2018 - 20:45

Today, Appeal Court judges ruled the Government's intrusive mass digital surveillance regime (better known as the "Snoopers' Charter") unlawful. This has been a core campaign issue for the Pirate Party UK over the years, as well as for non-partisan groups such as Liberty, Privacy International, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and the Open Rights Group.

Pirate Party Spokesperson Mark Chapman said:

What Price Security Surveillance Now?

Adrian Farrel's picture

A couple of weeks ago I attended a meeting of the Manchester branch of the Open Rights Group to discuss the proposed Investigatory Powers Bill known as the IPBill and currently about to be discussed and voted on by the House of Lords.

The meeting included a showing of The Haystack (http://thehaystackdocumentary.squarespace.com/watch/) a short documentary film about surveillance in the UK. We then had an open discussion of the film and the IPBill with a panel including Gary Herman from the National Union of Journalists, Gary Hough from Zen Internet, Loz Kaye from Open Intelligence, and myself.

While recognising the threats posed by terrorism, paedophilia, and organised crime, the room seemed unanimous in its belief that the IPBill is poorly conceived, lacking in detail, and over-reaching in its powers. For some background on the IPBill see https://wiki.openrightsgroup.org/wiki/Investigatory_Powers_Bill.

Investigatory Powers Bill: Andy Burnham is playing a dangerous game with our security and privacy

Monday, 4 April, 2016 - 14:30

The Pirate Party rejects Labour's attempt to amend the Investigatory Powers Bill. The bill is wrong in principle and dangerous in practice and should be scrapped.


Adrian Short, Pirate Party spokesperson, said:

"Andy Burnham's letter to the home secretary today shows just how closely Labour is prepared to work with the Tories to undermine the security and privacy of everyone in Britain.