Loz Kaye

Could Wikileaks revelations result in less internet freedom?

The Wikileaks website has revealed a diplomatic report setting out a long list of key facilities around the world which the United States describes as vital to its national security.

As cyber attacks on the Wikileaks site mount, could the affair end up limiting the freedom and power of the internet?

The BBC's Lawrence Pollard brought together Loz Kaye from the UK Pirate Party, which campaigns for internet freedom, and Stewart Baker, who used to work in policy for the US Department for Homeland Security.

Monday, 6 December, 2010 (All day)

Filesharer sentenced to three years' probation

A 58-year-old grandmother has become the first person in Scotland to be convicted of illegal music downloading.

Muir was caught downloading the tracks after an investigation by two music trade bodies, British Phonographic Industry (BPI) and the International Federation for the Phonographic Industry (IFPI).

Loz Kaye, the leader of the UK Pirate Party, said he was "hugely dismayed" by Muir's "disproportionate sentence". He added: "The evidence should have been properly tested in court. It seems now there is a pattern of rights holders targeting vulnerable people to score quick wins for publicity."

Tuesday, 31 May, 2011 - 23:00

The internet natives are revolting

Loz Kaye responds to President Sarkozy's proposal of a 'civilised internet'

It's not a blank territory, or a collection of tubes, it is a true community. Instead of narrow exploitation, the web emphasises cooperation and sharing for mutual cultural and economic benefit. Instead of isolationism and xenophobia, the web encourages free communication across borders. Instead of staid hierarchies, the web allows us all the opportunity to be active rather than passive participants in the world around us. But this can only remain the case if the internet is allowed to continue without undue interference and fettering.

 

Tuesday, 31 May, 2011 - 23:00

IT PRO: Pirate Bay UK future in doubt after High Court decision

The Pirate Bay has taken a hit in the UK after a judge at the High Court said the file-sharing site infringed on copyrights of major record labels.

Today Justice Arnold ruled the Pirate Bay and its users unlawfully share copyrighted music, after the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) led Sony and other record labels in taking their complaint to court.

“This hearing clearly demonstrates the limitations of merely requiring judicial involvement in censorship orders. Without any party there to represent either the website or its users (including lawful users), there was no opportunity to raise any defence as to the damage allegedly done by the site, or the proportionality in blocking the entire website,” said Loz Kaye, leader of the Pirate Party UK.


 

Monday, 20 February, 2012 - 01:00

BT is the final major ISP to block The Pirate Bay

BT is the UK's final major internet service provider to block The Pirate Bay, following a high court order for ISPs censor the torrent site.

The Pirate Party's leader, Loz Kaye, said, "Last year, Vince Cable promised the country that the site blocking provisions of the Digital Economy Act would not be implemented, this was widely interpreted as meaning the coalition is opposed to web censorship."

"Blocks on Pirate Bay have effectively short-circuited the democratic process."

Thursday, 21 June, 2012 - 01:00

Surfthechannel owner sentenced to four years over piracy

Anton Vickerman, whose surfthechannel.com website had around 400,000 users a day, was convicted of two counts of conspiracy to defraud in June following an eight-week trial at Newcastle crown court.

He is the first British man to be jailed in the UK for a website that linked to illegal copies of films and TV shows.

However, critics of the private prosecution described the jail term as "deeply concerning, inappropriate and disproportionate". Loz Kaye, leader of the Pirate Party UK, said the prosecution should never have been brought and was driven by private interests.

Tuesday, 14 August, 2012 - 01:00

TV Shack creator can be extradited to the US, UK court rules

STUDENT Richard O'Dwyer can be extradited to the US over copyright infringement allegations related to his web site TV Shack, a UK court has ruled.

O'Dwyer created the TV Shack web site and is the subject of an order for his extradition to the US, much like Gary McKinnon.

Support for O'Dwyer had been building on Twitter, with Pirate Party leader Loz Kaye saying after the news, "Devastated. Protecting copyright has come to mean accepting unacceptable human collateral like Richard O'Dwyer."

 

Friday, 13 January, 2012 (All day)

TVShack founder Richard O’Dwyer faces US extradition after Home Office ruling

The home secretary, Theresa May, has approved the extradition of TVShack founder, Richard O'Dwyer, to the US, where he could face up to five years in prison.

The 23-year-old, who studied at Sheffield Hallam University, set up the site nearly four years ago, offering users links to websites which steamed movies and TV programmes.

Pirate Party leader Loz Kaye wrote on Twitter that he was appalled by the decision.

Tuesday, 13 March, 2012 (All day)

'Piracy' student Richard O'Dwyer avoids US extradition

A student facing trial and possible imprisonment in the United States has struck a deal to avoid extradition, the High Court has been told.

Richard O'Dwyer, from Sheffield, is accused of breaking copyright laws. The US authorities claimed the 24-year-old's TVShack website hosted links to pirated films and TV programmes.

Loz Kaye, leader of Pirate Party UK, a political party which wants to legalise non-commercial file-sharing, said the deal struck by Mr O'Dwyer showed the US extradition request had been "disproportionate and unnecessary".

"It does not remove the underlying problem, though. The US cannot be allowed to be the copyright cops of the world," he said.

Wednesday, 28 November, 2012 (All day)

Why I'm standing in Manchester Central

Loz Kaye of the Pirate Party appeals to voters to overcome understandable cynicism and go for the opportunities on their own doorsteps.

Creeping privatisation means every aspect of our society is being divided up and parcelled out. It can be impossible to find out who is responsible for the most basic aspects of our environment, public space and services, let alone get anyone to do anything. Developers reshape our cities, rename our districts and yet are unwilling to preserve our common heritage, or, based on what many in Manchester have been telling me, even do basic repairs.  It is a society easy to feel powerless in.  

Wednesday, 1 August, 2012 (All day)

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