Mass Surveillance

Mass Surveillance has failed us yet again

 

 

 

Today in Manchester life seems to be going on as normal - well, as normal as it can be with armed officers and army personnel seen in places such as the Arndale Centre and at public transport hubs. This is a result of the despicable acts committed by the Manchester bomber. 

 

Nevertheless, we have these heavily armed officers on the streets not just because there are people who want to destroy our way of life, but also because our police service is stretched very thin by cuts to policing numbers, and by the sheer enormity of trying to trawl through masses of data collected from all corners of the UK and overseas. 

 

 

Government and Main Parties Point the Finger at Social Media for Terrorist Attack

David Elston's picture

While Manchester still grieves, there are those who have already started using the event to further their own political agenda.

As soon as the election is over, the government will seek to immediately pass new powers allowing the police and MI5 to remove all encryption from services such as WhatsApp and Facebook, despite social media providers' stringent opposition to any action weakening encryption. Further to this, non-partisan professionals such as Open Rights Group (ORG) have also continually raised their opposition to providing a back door to encryption, since it entirely destroys the concept of security.

Despite both campaigners and business professionals warning against it, the government is locked on this dangerous course.

Loz Kaye : A Question of Surveillance , Trust and Democracy

We are facing crunch time on mass surveillance. For years the Snoopers' Charter agenda has been pushed by politicians of various stripes, first as the Intercept Modernisation programme, then the Communications Data Bill. Now we are facing it again with a proposed Investigatory Powers Bill. However this time it has been set as a key priority by a majority Tory government cocky from an unexpected election victory. We have just months to head off a major defeat under very difficult political conditions.

Even so, all the expert advice on surveillance is pointing in the opposite direction at the moment. Court rulings have found both operation and legislation itself unlawful. Reports commissioned by parliament and the man formerly known as Deputy Prime Minister are calling for a root and branch reform of intercept legislation to properly balance privacy and security.

Making the Business Case Against Mass Surveillance

Loz Kaye's picture

Once again the threat of blanket surveillance legislation is back thanks to the new government. One of their first acts was to announce the return of the Snoopers' Charter.

This is not just a threat to civil liberties, and a waste of resources that should be better channelled on actually protecting us. It is a threat to our economy too. Software companies announced they would be pulling out of the UK :

http://arstechnica.co.uk/tech-policy/2015/06/software-companies-are-leaving-the-uk-because-of-governments-surveillance-plans/

This is way more significant than whether Katie Hopkins or Paul O'Grady come and go. The signal is that we have a government that doesn't get tech, that would put investment in danger, and would directly interfere in digital business.

UK surveillance legislation not fit for purpose, lacks transparency.

Thursday, 12 March, 2015 - 12:15

The report by the Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC) has said that the current piecemeal framework which governs how our intelligence services operate is unnecessarily complicated, resulting in a lack of transparency that is not in the public interest. 

Its inquiry has looked at the impact intrusive surveillance activities have on privacy. It was sparked after whistleblower Edward Snowden exposed US and UK mass surveillance programmes and detailed extensive internet and phone surveillance.

The ISC is recommending a new Act of Parliament to govern the intelligence and security Agencies. The legislation should clearly set out the intrusive powers available to the Agencies, the purposes for which they may use them, and the authorisation required before they may do so. 

Andy Halsall, Pirate Party Candidate for Sheffield Central said:

"This review was overdue. It's unfortunate that the report and subsequent recommendations were not put together by the ISC as part of its oversight function, but instead were prompted only when Edward Snowden blew the whistle on excessive surveillance. Without those leaks, we would not be debating these issues, or hearing about the serious concerns and proposed changes outlined in this report."

"Without Snowden, we would be less aware and less free."

Does Surveillance mean Security? Contherapy with Loz Kaye

Would you want ISIS finding your your banking details? Probably not says Loz Kaye, Leader of the Pirate party in this Contherapy Interview.

Friday, 6 February, 2015 - 12:00

GCHQ Mass Surveillance Unlawful

Saturday, 7 February, 2015 - 00:45

A judgement by the Investigatory Powers Tribunal has deemed that the information intercepted in bulk by the NSA, and then used by GCHQ over a period of seven years, to be unlawful and a breach of human rights law. When GCHQ obtained data about British citizens from the NSA, it attempted to bypass protections within the UK legal system.

Although the judgement covers GCHQ's access to Prism/Upstream, it doesn't cover Tempora and other UK programmes of mass surveillance.

Pirate Party Leader Loz Kaye said:

Snoopers' Charter won't be part of the Counter Terrorism bill

Monday, 26 January, 2015 - 20:15

The attempt to insert the bulk of the Communications Data Bill (CDB) into the Counter Terrorism and Security Bill (CTSB) by a quartet of Lords has been dropped. The proposed amendments to the CTSB were withdrawn after debate.

The cross-party group of four Lords included former Conservative defence secretary Lord King, Liberal Democrat former reviewer of counter-terror laws, Lord Carlile, the former Labour defence minister, Lord West, and former Metropolitan police commissioner, Lord Blair.

The Pirate Party's Andy Halsall said:

Snoopers' Charter Dropped - For Now

Monday, 26 January, 2015 - 20:15

A cross party group of peers lead by former Conservative defence minister Lord King attempted to insert the controversial Communications Data Bill in to the counter terrorism bill currently before the upper house.

After Monday's debate the amendments were withdrawn.

The Communications Data Bill has been widely criticised as a "Snoopers' Charter" for its blanket approach to surveillance.

Pirate Party Leader Loz Kaye said:

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