Mass Surveillance

Radicalising the Internet – The Politics of DRIP

Loz Kaye's picture

Apparently there is a national emergency going on. Not that you would particularly notice, as our elected representatives have been as busy Tweeting snarky comments about the reshuffle as actually debating the future of the communications of every person in the country. And indeed beyond, if Data Retention and Investigatory Powers (DRIP) bill goes through.

Stop DRIP

STOP DRIP - No to Mass Surveillance

In one short week, the UK Parliament is set to ram through a new bill on mass surveillance. It is the "Data Retention and Investigatory Powers" Bill, AKA DRIP. Even though the Government says it will change nothing, it will in fact attack our right to a private life and extend mass surveillance further.

  • DRIP will undermine human rights

  • DRIP was a stitch up between the 3 main parties behind closed doors

  • DRIP tightens the grip of mass surveillance 

  • DRIP will extend surveillance powers

  • DRIP will be forced through in less than a week, with no proper scrutiny

The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill will allow the state to force Internet and phone companies to store your personal data so it can be accessed at will by a large number of public bodies.

The Home Office has claimed it's a matter of "life and death". Is you ringing your partner or family telling them you forgot to pick up the milk a matter of life and death? Under DRIP it is, and you need to be recorded.

Surveillance Stitch Up to be Rushed Through

Thursday, 10 July, 2014 - 10:15

Legislation described as "emergency" will be brought in next week to force phone and internet companies to keep records of phone calls, texts and internet use. The proposals were agreed by all three main parties out of public view in the course of this week.

This follows a recent ruling of the European Court of Justice that such powers entail "a wide ranging and particularly serious interference with the fundamental rights to respect for private life and to the protection of personal data".

Time for Parliament to act on Mass Surveillance

Editor's picture

We hear all the time that the British public don't care about mass surveillance, privacy and Edward Snowden, but we know that's not true. It may be that those inside the Westminster bubble have been able to hide from how people really feel up to now, but it's time to change that.
It's time for members of Parliament to stand up, be counted, and support our freedoms.

We are asking you to contact your Member of Parliament to ask them to support Early Day Motion 147. It need not take long, the important thing is you tell them how you feel on this issue. Not all MPs can sign EDMs, front benchers don't as a rule, but it is still important that you take this opportunity to let them know you care about mass surveillance.

Theresa May Calls For More Surveillance Powers

Wednesday, 25 June, 2014 - 11:30

Theresa May has used the annual Lord Mayor's Defence and Security Lecture to call for changes to the law to give new powers of surveillance to the government. Despite the extensive coverage given to broad range of programmes revealed in by Edward Snowden, she claimed the UK's lack of technological capability presented a "great danger".

Vodafone reveals secret wires allowing direct-access government spying

Friday, 6 June, 2014 - 14:00

Vodafone has revealed direct connections to its network (and those of other telecoms groups) that allow government agencies to access, listen to, and record all conversations on its networks and, in some cases, track customers.

The scope of this access covers not just the UK, but also some of the 29 countries in which Vodafone operates in Europe and beyond. Vodafone is currently planning to publish a 40,000-word Law Enforcement Disclosure Report.

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