Policing

Improve the rehabilitation of offenders

We will introduce significant reforms to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. The current recidivism rate in the UK is around 50%, in part due to discrimination against former prisoners after release. The Pirate Party will propose removing the requirement to declare spent criminal convictions and toughen legislation making it illegal to discriminate against people with spent convictions.  

No to Police Commissioners

The election of Police Commissioners will be a step backward for justice in Britain. Whilst we support the idea that those individuals entrusted with upholding and enforcing the law should be open to public scrutiny, we do not believe that they should be elected to their offices and subject to political pressure. The Pirate Party will abolish Police Commissioners.  

Ensure the police are effective

The number of police officers should reflect the needs of the area in which they operate. However, every police force should have the resources to ensure that police officers are both highly visible and available when they are needed. The numbers and balance of Police Community Support Officers and Police Officers in every force area should be sufficient to achieve that goal.

UK police are free to confiscate travellers’ phones

UK Pirate Party leader Loz Kaye said that the revelation comes at a time when people are increasingly worried about privacy.

"These revelations are a further embarrassment for the UK. What with this, GCHQ and TEMPORA it's a wonder that anyone wants to come here at all. Once again we can see mission creep in the name of fighting terrorism. It's not enough for the Met to say that the Terrorism Act 2000 is subject to scrutiny, it's the powers themselves that are too broad," said Kaye.

Monday, 15 July, 2013 - 23:00

DNA Databases - A Challenge to the Law

Will Tovey's picture

Today the Supreme Court gave a long-awaited ruling on the subject of DNA databases and the ability of the police to store DNA samples of innocent people indefinitely. In a majority judgment (with two of the seven judges disagreeing) the Court ruled that the police practices were unlawful. Due to changes in the law being discussed by Parliament the judges did not go as far as ordering the police to change their practices within a certain time-frame or awarding compensation. It was, however, suggested that if changes were not made soon, further cases could be brought which were likely to succeed.

While this ruling does not mark the end of excessive police profiling, or of the police DNA databases, it is clearly a step towards a more balanced and proportionate system, and should be welcomed by all those who seek a fair and just policing system