PR

2016 the year everyone got interested.

Jason Halsey's picture

So this year has been certainly the most remarkable and discussed year in politics for a very long time. Very few people have not spoken about Brexit, the Tory leadership race, the Labour PLP and leadership, the Icelandic election or more recently the US election. I have been interested in politics for a number of years, and a Pirate party member since around the General Election of 2015. 2016 however, has truly inspired me, due to this sudden interest that most of my friends,colleagues and acquaintances have now developed. I dream that the typical apathy and lack of wanting to vote for thinking that "things never change" mind-set is starting to fall away. I hope that perhaps realisation that the First Past The Post system is what gives us the static system of government generally and is equally what divides us.

Some people wondered why the “losing” side to Brexit or the US Elections complained, moaned and did not accept the result. This is quite simple when you boil it down to the fact both were only a binary choice question, this is clearly going to be divisive by nature!

Make Votes Matter - Open Letter

David Elston's picture

Thousands are now calling for equal votes in all our democratic processes. Will the Tory leaders live up to their referendum rhetoric?

David Cameron has announced that he will resign as Prime Minister by October, meaning a leader chosen by the Conservative Party will become our new PM - with the public unable to give or withold its consent.

Following the EU Referendum the most important questions still have to be answered, including decisions about trade and immigration, foreign policy and sovereignty. The 2015 General Election manifestos did not include plans for a Britain out of Europe and the people have endorsed no particular exit plan.

Today I signed this open letter from the Make Votes Matter cross-party alliance.

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The future of electoral reform in the UK

Loz Kaye's picture

On behalf of the Pirate Party, I would like to thank the voters that turned out to cast their ballots in the national referendum on whether to change the electoral system to the Alternative Vote. The outcome is not what The UK Pirate Party or I had hoped for, even if it is what we had come to expect over recent weeks.

Our failure, both as a party and as individual campaigners, was to not properly inform voters of the choice in front of them, or indeed why it mattered at all. The same criticism applies equally to the No campaign.  On 5th May I was still explaining to people on the doorstep that they were going to be asked to vote in a referendum in addition to casting their council ballots. It is a sad day when, after months of campaigning on an issue as vital as electoral reform, voters were still unprepared to answer a simple yes/no question at the ballot box.