Reform

Sephy Hallow : Copyright Reform: We're Getting Somewhere

Participation in politics is something I've been thinking about a lot recently, and one of the common complaints I hear from friends of a politically apathetic persuasion is that politics no longer represents the views of the people; we aren't consulted, and when we are, our politicians make policies that go against public opinion or welfare. That's why I'm thrilled with the outcome of the UK copyright consultation, the first sign in a long time that the government listens to its people.

As one of the Pirate Party's flagship policies – and yet one of its most abstract – copyright reform has been one of the most difficult ideas to promote. With big business at stake, copyright reform was always going to be our most difficult policy to push, and we have met with resistance from many stakeholders, including the infamous BPI. However, after years of fighting, we finally have our first major breakthrough: namely, that new copyright exceptions are set to come into law (pending review from both houses) on the 1st June 2014.

Adrian Short : Books for prisoners - A novel approach

In a nutshell for those with limited reading time:

New rules that stop UK prisoners receiving parcels have led to a political row over prisoners' access to books being restricted. Justice secretary Chris Grayling sees books as a privilege that must be earned through prisoner cooperation rather than as a basic right for everyone. While prisoners will still have access to prison libraries, the new rule clearly greatly reduces prisoners' access to the wide range of reading opportunities that they might like. Whether prisoners are reading for pleasure or education (or both), easy access to a wide range of books should be non-negotiable in a decent society, even for the most notorious or uncooperative prisoners. People are more than just flesh and blood; we need to feed our minds as well as our bodies.

Copyright and Patent Reform

Sharing is Caring

“The only way to even try to limit file sharing, is to introduce
surveillance of everybody’s private communication.”

Reform the House of Lords

Reform of the House of Lords is necessary to ensure that the Lords remains relevant and effective as an expert body, and acts as a proper check on the activities of the Commons. However the scope, scale and specifics of any reform are something that needs to be discussed at length and in public. We all have a stake in the future shape of of our democracy.

We intend to start a national discussion about the shape of the Lords and how it can be improved without damaging the work that the Lords does.

Democratise the City of London

We support the democratisation of the City of London. Given the City's huge impact on the UK it is important that it is accountable and transparent.

Will the tax cut on patents do more harm than good?

Friday, 23 March, 2012 - 10:30

Andrew Robinson, Pirate Party business spokesperson:

In the wake of the budget announcement that the rate of tax on patents would be cut, GlaxoSmithKline has announced they will invest £500m in the UK.