Snoopers Charter

Snoopers Charter declared illegal, Pirates call on Government to rethink surveillance regime

Tuesday, 30 January, 2018 - 20:45

Today, Appeal Court judges ruled the Government's intrusive mass digital surveillance regime (better known as the "Snoopers' Charter") unlawful. This has been a core campaign issue for the Pirate Party UK over the years, as well as for non-partisan groups such as Liberty, Privacy International, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and the Open Rights Group.

Pirate Party Spokesperson Mark Chapman said:

Mark Chapman : Pirate Party - A Pirate's guide to online privacy

So what's this new IPBill I keep hearing about?

Recently passed as legislation by Parliament, the IPBill (amongst other things) requires your ISP to retain a log of all the websites and apps that your computer or mobile phone connects to. This data can then be viewed and accessed by the Police, Department of Health and any other Government agency that is given access without a court order. Equally, once stored it will be a magnet for hackers and some of the data will, at some point, be hacked into by a 3rd party and released publically.

Why is that a problem for me?

The list of every website that you visit is hugely personal information. Just think about those that you visited over the last week. It would almost certainly reveal who you bank with, where you get your main source of news, your political affiliation, which social media networks you use and how often, any health issues you might currently be concerned about, what schools your children attend, where you are thinking of going on holiday or what presents you are looking at for your loved one(s). For even the most innocent person, it is information that could be embarrassing if your work colleagues knew about it, but could be really valuable for anyone wanting to steal your identity. 

It is even more of a potential problem for lawyers protecting client confidentiality to ensure a fair justice system, for journalists protecting sources and the knowledge of stories that they are currently investigating, to minorites who are being, or who could be targetted and harrassed by others.

So what can I do about it?

David Elston : #SnoopersCharter / IPBill

A simple introduction to the #SnoopersCharter/IP Bill in this Youtube video.

Your Government has failed you

Wednesday, 16 November, 2016 - 23:15

Today we have heard the saddening news that the IP Bill has been through the 3rd and final reading in Parliament, and is now subject only to Royal Assent. In short, it is now inevitable that the bill will become law. That such an intrusive bill can become law, supported by both major parties, is a saddening indictment of the current state of politics.

 

Pirate Party Spokesperson for Young People, Michael Moriarty said:

Pirates needed to oppose Snoopers Charter

Tuesday, 1 November, 2016 - 23:00

The two largest parties in our government are clearly content with Theresa May's vision of a country that watches everyone. Meanwhile, the Lib Dems and Greens are proving to be ineffective at making a convincing case to stop or considerably restrict what the Investigatory Powers Bill can do.

We in the Pirate Party have been warning of the erosion of our civil liberties in this bill and ones just like it for years. It is why a Pirate voice is needed more than ever at all levels of government.

Snooper for PM

David Elston's picture



Despite the zombie IP Bill (Snooper's Charter) being knocked back to the depths from whence it came repeatedly, Teresa May's dark magic managed to revive the bill time and time again. Sadly the lack of opposition from Labour helped facilitate this bill and now it's creator is set to be our next Prime Minister.


Her coronation to PM is a sad day for privacy advocates. While our ISPs will be keeping hordes of data on us, Teresa May will get to decide as she leads the country into paranoia and a lack of privacy what to use that data for.

What Price Security Surveillance Now?

Adrian Farrel's picture

A couple of weeks ago I attended a meeting of the Manchester branch of the Open Rights Group to discuss the proposed Investigatory Powers Bill known as the IPBill and currently about to be discussed and voted on by the House of Lords.

The meeting included a showing of The Haystack (http://thehaystackdocumentary.squarespace.com/watch/) a short documentary film about surveillance in the UK. We then had an open discussion of the film and the IPBill with a panel including Gary Herman from the National Union of Journalists, Gary Hough from Zen Internet, Loz Kaye from Open Intelligence, and myself.

While recognising the threats posed by terrorism, paedophilia, and organised crime, the room seemed unanimous in its belief that the IPBill is poorly conceived, lacking in detail, and over-reaching in its powers. For some background on the IPBill see https://wiki.openrightsgroup.org/wiki/Investigatory_Powers_Bill.

Investigatory Powers Bill: Andy Burnham is playing a dangerous game with our security and privacy

Monday, 4 April, 2016 - 14:30

The Pirate Party rejects Labour's attempt to amend the Investigatory Powers Bill. The bill is wrong in principle and dangerous in practice and should be scrapped.


Adrian Short, Pirate Party spokesperson, said:

"Andy Burnham's letter to the home secretary today shows just how closely Labour is prepared to work with the Tories to undermine the security and privacy of everyone in Britain.

Defeat the Snoopers' Charter

Tuesday, 15 March, 2016 - 10:45

The Pirate Party is calling on MPs of all parties to work together to defeat the Investigatory Powers Bill, which gets its second reading in the House of Commons today.

The bill would force internet companies to keep customers' browsing records for up to a year and turn them over to authorities without a warrant. It also seeks to legalise the mass hacking of people's phones and computers by government without any individual suspicion.

Adrian Short, Pirate Party spokesperson, said:

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