Snoopers Charter

Snooping Law Found Illegal

Friday, 17 July, 2015 - 12:00

Controversial surveillance legislation that was pushed through Parliament in days has been found to be unlawful by the High Court. It was found that the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 (DRIPA) failed to provide clear and precise rules to protect data and that the access is not authorised by a court and independent body.

UK government outlines plans for supercharged surveillance powers

THE UK GOVERNMENT has announced the return of the Snoopers' Charter in the form of the Investigatory Powers Bill, which it describes as "new legislation to modernise the law on communications data".

Wednesday, 27 May, 2015 - 15:15

Tory Queen's Speech - Human Rights Chaos

Wednesday, 27 May, 2015 - 12:15

The Queen has set out the proposed legislation by the first Conservative majority government for nearly twenty years.

Attempts to scrap the Human Rights Act (HRA) and replace it with a British Bill of rights have been delayed, breaking David Cameron's promise that this would happen in the first 100 days of the new parliament. Removing the HRA has run in to problems of opposition within the Conservative party and because it is written into devolution deals.

Measures to combat extremism, a new law on communications data, and changing the ability to strike were announced.

Andy Halsall : Let's make being 'Wrong on Rights' unelectable

When it comes to the clash between surveillance and civil liberties, it seems the fight is still very much on. It's a war we have to win and with the General Election looming, making the case that mass surveillance and privacy should be important issues for voters is pretty vital.

Happily, on that score, there have been a number of developments that might just help us move the debate forward.

On Monday, the Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights, Europe’s top rights body published a report that shows that it believes mass surveillance is a significant threat to human rights.  That's good news for anyone hoping to see a rolling back of the surveillance state.

The report recognises what the Pirate Party and others have been saying for years about the threat of mass surveillance. Like us, it did not shy away from discussing the disclosures made by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden:

“The disclosures have provided compelling evidence of the existence of far-reaching, technologically advanced systems put in place by US intelligence services and their partners in certain Council of Europe member states to collect, store and analyse communication data, including content, location and other metadata, on a massive scale”

Snoopers' Charter won't be part of the Counter Terrorism bill

Monday, 26 January, 2015 - 20:15

The attempt to insert the bulk of the Communications Data Bill (CDB) into the Counter Terrorism and Security Bill (CTSB) by a quartet of Lords has been dropped. The proposed amendments to the CTSB were withdrawn after debate.

The cross-party group of four Lords included former Conservative defence secretary Lord King, Liberal Democrat former reviewer of counter-terror laws, Lord Carlile, the former Labour defence minister, Lord West, and former Metropolitan police commissioner, Lord Blair.

The Pirate Party's Andy Halsall said:

Snoopers' Charter Dropped - For Now

Monday, 26 January, 2015 - 20:15

A cross party group of peers lead by former Conservative defence minister Lord King attempted to insert the controversial Communications Data Bill in to the counter terrorism bill currently before the upper house.

After Monday's debate the amendments were withdrawn.

The Communications Data Bill has been widely criticised as a "Snoopers' Charter" for its blanket approach to surveillance.

Pirate Party Leader Loz Kaye said:

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