Tax

Drugs

Morgan Hill's picture

Since the dawn of human existence we have been putting things into our bodies to see what they do, then repeating be cause we either liked, got addicted, or simply wanted a bigger sample size (yay science). Drugs aren’t even a human phenomenon, cats like catnip, and other animals have been chewing mildly hallucinogenic leaves for millennia. Somewhere in the trail of human history we developed the artificial idea of an acceptable drug, as science developed we were able to categorise them, and more recently the state has taken an interest in substance consumption.

I’m not by any means arguing that many drugs, used in many ways, aren’t harmful to health and society. My core position in that there will never be zero harm as a result of drugs, instead of targeting impractical zero drug futures, it would be more pragmatic, compassionate and successful to think about ways in which we can reduce the harm of drugs. We must recognise the complexity of a human diaspora. No single factor solely relates to the harm caused by drugs. There are no magic theories, that cover the individual and a massive population with equal accuracy, only suggestions that something might help.

The Investment Evader

David Elston's picture

                                           

 

With the recent interest surrounding Tax Evasion, I decided to revisit some of our policies and write a collective piece:

Tax loopholes have seemingly become a habituate of our corporations.

Each time a tax loophole is closed a new one is opened. This is partly due to our wildly overcomplicated tax system with responsibilities spread across varying different departments and even when caught the penalties for evading tax are often negated by the long term gains (aka “Investment Evaders”).

We need to enforce punishment. In Iceland they jailed the bankers that caused the financial crisis =- in the UK they were given a bonus. Does that seem right to you?

A Budget Response - Showy Gimmicks vs Solid Foundations

Mark Chapman's picture

As expected in his pre-election showpiece this was a political budget from the most political of chancellors. One by one he attempted to deal with Labour's one-dimensional election attack lines whilst trumpeting whichever statistics he could find to claim positive performance for his now infamous Long-Term Economic Plan.

Despite the rhetoric however, it was a short-term budget from a Coalition that appear to be pulling in different directions, with consequent confusion and complexity. This was exacerbated by the showy gimmicks that provided Osborne with so called 'gags' at Labour's expense - kitchens and deeds of variation. 

Fundamentally however these exemptions and allowances add complexity, rather than simplicity to an already overburdened tax system and are almost certain to be the tax avoidance loopholes of the future.

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