Vote

Is a Vote for Your Principles a Wasted Vote?

Adrian Farrel's picture

The media are full of proposals for electoral pacts and ideas for tactical voting. These suggestions are based around keeping one party or another out of government, or making sure that a particular person is not returned to Westminster.

But where does this leave a minority party? Should it encourage its supporters to vote for candidates from other parties and maybe for different parties in different constituencies?

And what should voters do in our first past the post system where their first choice from one of the smaller parties is unlikely to get elected? Should they vote for the person they support or should they consider that a wasted vote?

I am personally very frustrated and disappointed by negative voting. At the previous election my MP said to me words equivalent to, "Vote for me because at least I'm not one of them." This is not exactly a resounding reason to do anything.

Think Different, standing up for Sheffield.

It's General Election time and I'm looking forward to representing the Party and our ideas in Sheffield as the Party's PPC in Sheffield Central.

Five years ago when I helped Tim Dobson with his campaign in Manchester Gorton, I wasn't entirely sure he wasn't mad putting himself on the line for the Pirate Party. But I helped out and we learned a lot. I realised he was doing absolutely the right thing, providing a solution to the problems he wanted to solve.

Andy Halsall : The cost of action in Iraq

Our involvement must be more than military and truly in the cause of freedom and democracy.

When parliament voted to invade Iraq in 2003, it was based on what we later found out to be disinformation and deceit. We were misled. The countless thousands who opposed the war were vocal in their opposition - but they were not listened to, they were ignored. And the UK went to war.

Today, Iraq isn't the beacon of peace and democracy that we had hoped it would become, in a region with far too little of either. Far from it. Iraq is a very troubled state. The sectarian divisions that arose after our invasion and the impact of the poor planning and even poorer decisions taken during the post-invasion period continue to hinder progress and freedom in Iraq.

It is absolutely true that the situation in Iraq is at least in part down to the choices we made in 2003. Yet the decision parliament was asked to make today was very different, the situation it aims to address is different and the context in which it was raised is different.  

You want to vote Pirate? It'd be rude not to oblige.

Editor's picture

We can do better, and we will - We want to stand more candidates with more local branches.

Voting Pirate

Ever since the Pirate Party came on the scene in 2009, some people have been able to vote Pirate in local, parliamentary and most recently european elections. But never as many as we would like.

There have been 22 Pirate Party candidates since 2009. Your candidates have stood in 24 different elections, ranging from local elections in England and Scotland, Parliamentary elections, European Elections and a whole host of by-elections.  

In the five years we have been standing in elections we have learned a lot, and changed the way we approach elections almost entirely.  We have have gone from receiving tens of votes in our first elections, to thousands in our most recent. In the EU election,  8,600 people felt confident enough to put crosses next to our name.

Our proportion of the vote has changed too, where we have active branches, even in areas massively dominated by the biggest parties, we are now seeing anything up to 5% of voters putting an X next to our candidates names.

We have come a long way in a short time, but we have along way to go.

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